7 Horse Buying Mistakes

September 09, 2015 2 min read

7 Horse Buying MistakesBuying a horse is an exciting yet stressful experience. A horse is a large investment which first time buyers need to take into consideration when purchasing. The thrill of buying a horse can get you off course from what you actually need. Purchasing the wrong horse can be a waste of money and potentially unsafe. Here are some of the most common mistakes that most horse buyers make:
  1. Buying a green horse for a green rider. This happens more often than you think. Some beginner riders buy horses that are also “beginners.” This can be potentially dangerous for both rider and horse. If you are a beginner rider, get a more experienced horse. You’d be surprised how much they can teach you.
  1. Saying “no” to older horses. Old horses are not bad! They actually make awesome beginner horses. Age turns some people away because they fear soundness, health, etc. However, if proper measures are taken, a horse in his late teens or even early twenties can last much longer than you think!
  1. Buying babies for babies.Having your child grow up with a horse seems like a great idea. Well, it’s not. Young horses and young riders generally don’t mix very well due to the inexperience and lack of confidence on both ends. Consider buying your horse a well-trained horse that they can groom, saddle, and play with at their own free will. A horse that you can completely trust is worth their weight in gold!
  1. Buying horses at auctions. This doesn’t ALWAYS go wrong, but it definitely has a possibility. People have a tendency to get carried away at auctions. A horse might look good from far away but can be a completely different animal when you get them home. If you do buy a horse from an auction, make sure you know the auction’s rules before going into it.
  1. Impulse horse buying. Sometimes the pretty horses aren’t the best. Don’t buy a horse on first sight. Take the time to try the horse out then think about it for a few days and come back to it.
  1. No trial period. If you find a horse you really like, don’t be afraid to ask the owner if they will be willing to let you do a trial period. Most owners are willing to work with buyers on this. If the owner says no, find out why. This might tell you if the horse is all they are cracked up to be or not!
  1. Not taking the time and expense of horse care into consideration. Owning a horse is a huge responsibility. You can’t just leave your horses for the weekend when you want to get away and most times they can’t come with you. This is a huge responsibility that you must consider buying pulling the trigger and buying one.
Buying a horse can be hard but don’t make these mistakes and you should have greater success with your purchase. Good luck!

Do you know someone that is looking to buy a horse? Share these 7 horse buying mistakes with them today!

For more information on horse buying mistakes, visit: http://horses.about.com/od/buyingyourfirsthorse/tp/buyingmistakes.htm


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