Is Your Horse Stressed?

September 11, 2020 2 min read

Just as humans experience stress in situations that are mentally or physically difficult, horses also experience stress as a natural response to changes or challenges in their environment. Stress in your horse can result in anxiousness and can cause physical symptoms such as ulcers and colic.  Recognizing that your horse is stressed and understanding what is causing their anxiety could help to improve your horse’s quality of life.

Spotting the signs:

  1. Weight loss
  2. Tooth grinding
  3. Bad behavior
  4. Flaring nostrils
  5. Head tossing or shaking
  6. Sweating
  7. Frequent swishing of the tail
  8. Kicking out
  9. Cribbing
  10. Decreased appetite

Common stressful situations:

  1. Being transported
  2. Being separated from other horses
  3. New barns
  4. A farrier or vet visit
  5. Beginning training
  6. Changes in weather
  7. Different feeding schedule

Ways to help:

  1. Regular Turnout

Horses are designed to roam and graze for up to 14 hours a day, so keeping them confined to their stable can increase stress levels. So, it is important to give your horse space and regular exercise.

  1. Routine

Horses enjoy a regular schedule, so try to keep their feeding and exercise schedule as consistent as possible, even when traveling.

  1. Provide continuous access to hay

Using hay nets with small holes to make them work for their hay and keep them busy.

  1. Keep other horses nearby

Horses are naturally social animals, and in the wild their safety depends on the presence of a herd. You can give your horse that same security at home by keeping several horses in your barn and by turning your horse out in a group.

  1. Keep your horses mind occupied

Keep them busy with toys that provide mental stimulation or hide their food to prevent boredom.

You can minimize stress for your horse by making sure they have a comfortable and healthy environment. This involves regular turnout, and plenty of access to quality and varied food, water, and nutrition. Minimizing changes to your horse’s environment as much as possible will also help, and this includes changes to their routine.

Another thing that will help your horse’s stress would be Benefab’s Rejuvenate SmartScrim. It features 90 magnets(1100 gauss) over key acupuncture points for stimulation of those areas. In ancient (and current) Chinese medicine, acupuncture is performed by using one’s own blood to re-inject over targeted acupuncture points. The reasoning for this method is because the body takes quite some time to re-absorb its own blood after being placed in targeted areas. Therefore, prolonging the benefits.

We have selected these magnets to serve to the affect by pulling the blood to those targeted areas which will continually stimulate those areas during and after the SmartScrim is worn. Each magnet is enclosed in a soft cushion for enhanced comfort. Sheet harmonizes bodily functions safely and naturally, stimulating recovery time, promoting blood circulation, increasing oxygen flow, and ultimately reducing pain and stiffness.



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