Natural Mosquito Repellants

April 16, 2021 2 min read

As the warmer weather is starting to move in for summertime, so are those pesky mosquitos! Spring through Summer months are their peak season, but surprisingly, mosquitos can actually survive in temperatures close to 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

On top of those itchy bites, mosquitos can carry harmful diseases such as the West Nile Virus, Zika, or Malaria which can cause serious complications. So, now is the perfect time to find a mosquito repellant that fits your lifestyle in the most natural, environmentally friendly, and effective ways!

Here are 5 natural repellants to help you prepare for mosquito season:

  1. Lemon Eucalyptus Oil (OLE):This oil is plant-based and is approved by the CDC to be as effective as repellants that contain DEET (main ingredient in chemical repellants) at a low concentration. It can provide up to 95% protection for up to 3 hrs.

How to use it:Combine half water, half witch hazel (or a vegetable oil) and 10 drops of OLE into a bottle and shake well.

  1. Cinnamon Oil:Cinnamon oil is known to kill off mosquito larvae better than DEET. It contains different properties like eugenol and cinnamyl acetate to prevent different primary species of mosquitos.

How to use it:In a 50ml bottle, combine 10 drops of cinnamon oil and fill the rest with water, shake well.

  1. Catnip Oil:Catnip oil is known to be one of the most effective repellants against mosquitos, said to be up to 10x more effective than DEET. Mosquitos cannot bear the smell, so catnip oil is expected to last up 7 hours.

How to use it:In a 50ml bottle, combine 10 drops of catnip oil and dilute with water until full.

  1. Tea Tree Oil:The strong aroma of this oil is guaranteed to keep mosquitos distant. Tea tree oil also has anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties to both prevent and heal bites naturally.

How to use it:Combine 30 ml of coconut oil and 10 drops of tea tree oil in a bottle and shake well.

  1. Peppermint Oil:Peppermint is one of mosquito’s least favorite smells—and it’s a potent smell—so they will stay far away from you when have this scent! This oil can also relieve itching symptoms if you do happen to be bit.

How to use it:Combine half water, half witch hazel, and 10 drops of peppermint into a bottle and shake well.

 

Some other tips to protect yourself from mosquitos are covering up your body as much as possible (i.e. pants, closed-toe shoes, long sleeves, hats, etc.), have a fan running when outside, and plant mosquito-repelling plants around your home.

If you live in an area where mosquitos are heavily populated, or you are prone to being bit, mosquito repellants are a must. It is important to know just what kind of ingredients you are spraying on your skin and all around your environment. Try some of these natural options during this season and experience all the benefits they have. You may be surprised by the power of nature!



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