Spend $250 or more, receive a FREE Body Wrap.

0

Your Cart is Empty

Equine Conjunctivitis: Pinkeye

August 16, 2017 2 min read

One of the common eye conditions seen in horses, especially during the summer months, is Conjunctivitis, or Pinkeye. Conjunctivitis occurs when the pink lining of the eyelids (the conjunctiva) become inflamed. This common infection can be characterized by inflammation, redness, and a watery discharge of the eye. It arises when the tissue around the eye is damaged, normally because of trauma, leaving it vulnerable to be attacked by bacteria.

What causes Pinkeye?

  1. Allergic reaction
  2. Inflammation
  3. Environmental irritants
  4. Parasites
  5. Result of damage to the eye
  6. Lack of insufficient tear production
  7. Abnormally shaped eyelids
  8. Face flies or insect bites.
Pinkeye may also be due to several factors such as a dusty environment, an illness, or a viral or/and bacterial organism infecting the eye. The first thing you may notice is watery discharge. If the eye is producing a lot of tears, they will start to run down the horse’s face, and the dried secretions will be blackish and crusty. Since it can affect one or both eyes and lead to more serious conditions, Pinkeye should be given immediate attention if it does not clear up quickly with a recommended saline solution flushing treatment.

What are some signs that I can look for?

  1. Redness of the eye
  2. Discharge that is clear, yellow, or with mucus
  3. Irritated eyelids
  4. Closed eyelids or squinting
  5. Reaction to bright light
  6. Head shaking
So, what happens if a Saline Solution flushing treatment is ineffective at clearing up the infection? In this case, it may be necessary for a veterinarian to flush the nasolacrimal (tear) duct or give a topical antibiotic ointment steroid or cream. Since some causes of this eye disease are infectious, it is always good to practice not sharing items, such as grooming tools and feeding buckets. In addition, using a good mesh fly mask will help protect your horse’s eyes. For your best chance at avoiding Pinkeye, help prevent the infection by keeping your horse clean and in a well-ventilated area. Every week we like to make your life easier by delivering you expert information, along with good deals on helpful products for your daily life. To help you prevent Pinkeye, we went ahead and found these great and affordable fly masks on SmartPak to help your horse, check them out >>> here!


Also in Blog

Have You Heard of Apitherapy?
Have You Heard of Apitherapy?

January 15, 2021 2 min read

Apitherapy is the method of using bee products for disease prevention or treatment. Honeybees produce honey, pollen, propolis, royal jelly, and beeswax all of which are used by people for nutrition, immune system support, treatment of a variety of ailments, skin care, and healing of open wounds. 
Equine Sacroiliac Injuries
Equine Sacroiliac Injuries

January 08, 2021 2 min read

The sacroiliac joint is a location where the horses back and pelvis meet. It transfers the action of his hind legs to his back, translating the push into forward motion.  The sacroiliac joints are stabilized by strong ligaments that join the iliac bones to the sacrum and to the backbone.
January is Walk Your Dog Month
January is Walk Your Dog Month

December 31, 2020 2 min read

Is the cold, frigid winter making it hard for you to get out and walk your dog? January is Walk Your Dog Month and what better way to kick start you and your dog’s New Year’s Resolutions by getting out in the great outdoors and getting active and healthy.