What Are Wolf Teeth?

February 10, 2015 2 min read

a wolf teethWe’ve all heard of the them, but what are wolf teeth? Where are they located? What are they used for? Why are they considered a problem? We will answer these questions today! What are wolf teeth? Wolf teeth are known as the first premolar teeth in horses. Don’t mistake them for the canines. These teeth usually erupt at 5-12 months of age. Unlike the other teeth, these teeth do not continue to grow. About 75-80% of horses will develop wolf teeth. You may have heard that wolf teeth are gender related. This is false. Wolf teeth develop equally in both colts and fillies. Where are wolf teeth located? Wolf teeth are located in front of the first main cheek teeth. They are usually 2-3 centimeters in front of the first cheek teeth. Wolf teeth are generally found in the upper jaw but they can also develop in the lower jaw as well. You may also find that the wolf tooth may only be on one side. This is not uncommon. Most wolf teeth erupt through the gums, but sometimes they do not. These are called “blind” wolf teeth as they are hidden under the gums. What are wolf teeth used for? Wolf teeth are totally useless for horses in today’s world. Millions of years ago, the wolf teeth were similar in size to the rest of the teeth. These teeth were used as grinding teeth as horses were brush eaters. As horses have evolved, these teeth are no longer beneficial for the horse. Why are wolf teeth considered a problem? Wolf teeth are considered a problem for most horses. Since the teeth are no longer used, they are useless. These teeth can come into contact with the bit, which can cause the horse pain and discomfort. These teeth still have nerves. The tooth can be hit when the reins are pulled and the bit is drawn back in the horse’s mouth. With extraction of the tooth, horses generally resume good behavior. For more information on wolf teeth in horses, click HERE. Article written by Emily Konkel

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