Moringa Plants: The Tree of Life

June 01, 2021 3 min read

Moringa Plants: The Tree of Life

When you think about plants, you may think about how you can benefit from certain plants. Plants are not just helpful (and potentially delicious) to have in your garden, but they are beneficial to your health. Moringa Plants are well known for their several health benefits, and because of that characteristic, they are called "The Tree of Life."

 

There is a reason the Moringa plant is considered part of the “Super Foods” group. It is exceedingly high in many nutrients, including eight necessary amino acids that our bodies need, but cannot develop: Vitamins B, B1, B2, B3, D, and E.

According to an article by , (The Survival Mom:https://thesurvivalmom.com/all-about-the-moringa-plant/ ) “[Moringa] has three times as much iron as spinach, four times the calcium in milk, four times the Vitamin A in carrots, and is higher in Vitamin C than Oranges.” As a matter of fact, it is so powerful that African Nutrition Clinics use it to help rehabilitate undernourished, nursing mothers.

 

Moringa plants are a great asset not only to your pantry, but to your garden as well. The leaves, seeds (seed pods), and flowers are all edible.Before you eat the flowers, they must be lightly cooked to neutralize certain toxic compounds that are found within the flower. The flower could also be used to make a delicious cup of tea or be battered and fried like Squash Blossoms.

The tender and young seed pods, also referred to as "Drumsticks," can be cooked identical to string green beans, and has a slightly similar taste to them—only sweeter. The leaves of the Moringa plant are normally found in South Asian dishes. You can add them to soups, omelets, a curry dish, or use them as a garnish.  Some people may say the taste resembles spinach with pecans when cooked.  When raw, the taste is somewhat powerful, like radishes.

The seeds of the plant cook like peas when young and roast like nuts when they are more mature—Only eat seeds that are meant to be for human consumption; the seeds that are intended for cultivation are periodically sprayed with insecticides.

Did you know that two spoonfuls of dried, powdered Moringa seeds can be used to purify as much as 20 liters of water? Now, that is impressive! The powder bonds with particles in the water, causing them to submerge to the bottom; the distilled water can be poured through a cloth filter. Therefore, this takes care of most (not all) of the bacteria present in the water.

The Moringa plant is grown throughout many regions such as Jamaica, the Philippines, India, Africa, Egypt, Pakistan, the West Indies, Cuba, Hawaii, and Florida. The temperatures it grows best in are between 77 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit, and it can handle some light frost. No doubt, this plant will thrive in most tropical and subtropical weather conditions.

When it comes to growing Moringa Plants, they don’t require too much maintenance. The location of your plant needs to be in a bright, sunny location for the proper amount of direct sunlight. Deep watering is more beneficial to your Moringa plant because, in time, this process protects the plant through times of drought, while a light watering at the surface will dry much faster than below ground.

The soil needs to be well-drained but not overly wet. Helpful tip: Do not saturate the soil—This helps prevent root rot, which is what Moringa plants are sensitive to. As for fertilization, you should apply a light application of All-Purpose fertilizer to help support the plant's growth. Although, it is not necessary for repetitive fertilization, it is recommended to regularly use manure or compost.

Plants are on this earth for several reasons. Some plants may not help support your health as the Moringa plant does. However, there is a reason it is known to be called "The Miracle Tree." This plant goes above and beyond whether parts of it are being cooked in the kitchen for a tasteful meal, or all the high-packed nutrients that are supporting your immune system.  Either way, with a plant as beneficial as this, it is a must-have for your pantry (or garden, if you have one).

 



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