Spring Into Workout Tips

May 11, 2018 3 min read

Spring is in the air; which means here comes the challenge of getting our horses back into shape. If you live in a state that has a very cold winter, chances are that even if you have an indoor arena, you are taking some small breaks during the frigid cold of winter time. It may be tempting to jump on your horse and go for a long ride the minute you feel the warmth of spring in the air, but it’s likely that you’ll need to bring him into the new season with caution.

Get educated:

Take the time to create a workout plan that’s specific to each horse and considers factors such as age, weight, normal workout frequency, and amount of time the horse has had off. For a safe approach, start your horse off with incremental increases in length or difficulty of work on a five-day cycle. This means start light and gradually increase the intensity of the work every five days. This will give your horse’s body time to accommodate to the new intensity before moving to the next level. As you build on conditioning, increase either duration of time in the saddle or speed, but never both at the same time. Always keep in mind to monitor your horse’s legs for signs of stress, such as lameness, swelling, or pain. During this process, keep in mind that since your horse is out of shape and will need to be brought back into condition gradually, if you push things too fast your horse could get injured. As always, a horse’s general health should be checked before any fitness work begins; such as vaccines, dentistry, shoeing, and worming, if necessary.

Get your horse back into shape safely:

1. Have your farrier come out Have your horse's hooves trimmed and shod, if necessary. 2. Check your saddle fit As your horse loses condition, the shape of his back can change. 3. Wear protective equipment Always be safe when returning to routine work; keep your helmet on. 4. Do a lot of walking work and low stretching Start “low and slow,” as they say it. 5. Gradually introduce more challenging activities Introduce new exercises with patience. 6. Monitor your horse Keep an eye on the soundness of your horse.

Preventing and Maintaining Soreness:

As with any work, horses tend to be prone to soreness at this time. There are a plethora of products to help you get a head start, but it’s important to find brands that you trust. For fast relief of sore muscles and joints, incorporate a few sprays of Sore No More’s Performance Ultra Liniment, a clinically-backed liniment proven to help reduce deep tissue and soft tissue discomfort, and improve the performance of equine athletes. It’s safe to use under tack and before and after rides to help soothe and prevent pain. It pairs perfectly with the Rejuvenate SmartScrim, a clinically-backed Ceramic infused scrim with magnets sewn over top of predetermined key acupressure points that has been proven to reduce back soreness in moderate to high exercise horses. Both of these products help aid in a more comfortable and effective training session. With safe, all-natural ingredients, the Liniment and SmartScrim combo will not irritate even sensitive skin. The SmartScrim can also be used to help stimulate recovery time, promote blood circulation, and increase oxygen flow; ultimately reducing pain and stiffness. With all of these tips in mind, you’re sure to have a successful transition back into warm-weather workouts.


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