Horses and Fireworks: Safety First

July 03, 2017 2 min read

Safety first.

From a young age, most of us were taught to think of safety first when attempting anything new. For those of us who grew up with horses, safety was paramount anytime we spent time with our horses. Horses are powerful animals and it is our job to ensure their safety and well-being. During this special and celebratory time of year there is so much happening, but we need to take a moment before we head off to celebrate and think of our horses's safety. Here are a few simple tips to ensure your horse is safe while you celebrate:
  1. Keep your horse's routine the same as you normally would. If your horses are in at night, stick to that routine, leave the lights on and turn on a radio with soothing music. Music or the noise of a fan may help to dull the shock of the fireworks noises.
  2. Make sure to keep yourself safe and do not stay in the stall or in the pasture with your horse. Scared horses can be unpredictable and it is highly unlikely you could hold your horse still in the event they panicked.horses fireworks
  3. Before the sun goes down make sure to check all fences, gates, and other latches to ensure everything is secured in the event your horses get running. Also check for holes or other places in your pasture that could injure your horse if they are running around in a panic.
  4. Make sure your horse has proper identification in the event they get out. It can be something as simple as writing your phone number on a hoof with a sharpie marker, a halter identification tag or an embroidered fetlock or neck band.
  5. If your horses are normally kept in a pasture vs the barn, a larger turnout is preferable to a smaller arena or pasture. You want to make sure your horse does not feel trapped.
  6. If you have a young or very sensitive horse, take the next year and work on desensitizing them to loud popping noises and fireworks. This will not only benefit you and your horse on the 4th of July, but all throughout the year making your horse much safer.
Something simple that may work as well to help suppress the noise is ear pom poms. We suggest using these ahead of time to ensure your horse is accustomed to how the poms feel in their ears. As a last resort, consult your veterinarian regarding sedation if you have tried all other methods. From the Benefab team, we wish you a wonderful and blessed holiday week. Feel free to share these helpful tips with your friends and horse family as well.


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