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Pasture Fence Check in the Winter Months

February 03, 2014 2 min read

The weather in Michigan FINALLY broke today! (Whoo-hoo, 30 degrees!... Is that something to cheer for?) I let my horses out this morning and for some reason decided to take a look at my fences. Thankfully I did because part of my electric fence had a large sag in it. It got me thinking; maybe a mid-winter pasture fence check wouldn’t be a bad thing? Checking your pastures in this weather is not at the top of anyone’s to do list but it is a must. This winter, especially, we have had lots of snow, ice, and high winds, which can greatly damage your fencing. Walk your fences lines and take note of the areas that need repair. Be sure to come back that day with the proper tools and get to work! Here are some things to check for: 1. Sags in wire fencing – this can be easily repaired by simply tightening or refastening the wire 2. Broken or weak boards – these boards more than likely will need to be completely replaced 3. Protruding or loose nails – nails may have to be re-secured or replaced 4. Sagging gates – the gates may need to be tightened to get them up off the ground in a more secure spot 5. Broken or inoperable electric wires – use a fence tester to see if your fence is still working. Broken wires may need to be completely replaced 6. Downed trees – check for trees that are down near your fences. Remove them and/or fix the fencing if necessary Although this may seem like a daunting task, it is necessary in order to keep your horses safe. A broken fence can cause a number of injuries or allow horses to get loose. Take the time to walk your pastures and make sure all is safe and sound. You will be happy that you did! For more information of checking pasture fences visit: http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/a-mid-winter-fence-safety-check/


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